In my Linux Commands for Beginners series, we’ll explore everything you need to know in order to be productive on the Linux Command Line. You’ll learn basic commands, input/output redirection, package management, resource monitoring, troubleshooting, and more. In this video, we’ll see how the find command can be used to quickly search through our filesystem.

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13 Comments

idney brandao

April 21, 2020

Thank you ! You have been helping me!!

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CodingAndCaffeine

April 21, 2020

kali linux as well?

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Mk. Nava

April 21, 2020

Bash shell script i can c only 16 videos…Is it closed there…?

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Mk. Nava

April 21, 2020

Good…"Find " command was not there on old tutorial

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Jonathan Lupica

April 21, 2020

So useful ! As always…

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Abu Laith

April 21, 2020

please include your commands in the description, Thanks

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Anton Surviyanto

April 21, 2020

What is the difference between find, whereis, locate, etc? Which one were the basic command?. In Ubuntu I can use locate command but not in Manjaro, It's weird. I thought Linux is all the same. 😄😄

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Perhaps

April 21, 2020

The "find" command can be used to identify hard linked related files, via the -samefile option.

One day at work, I was looking to recover disk space and found a large file to delete. After deleting it, the available disk space remained unchanged. This was due to that file having more than one name (it was hard linked to another name).

Assuming that the file that I want to delete is named "testfile.txt". Then, running:
$ find -samefile testfile.txt -print

./testfile.txt

./testfile2.txt

The above reveals the other i-node for that file (the two filenames refer to the same file — they are not copies of each other). Of course, that was a simple example. You might need to search from "/" instead of from your current directory, in order to locate all matching hard links.

I would like to see a video going over more applications of the "find" command (finding files with certain permission, sizes, owner, prune, mount, etc).

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Yunus Emre Işık

April 21, 2020

good tutorial thanks a lot

Reply

Steve Dias Da Cruz

April 21, 2020

Good video! 🙂
I commonly use find to count the number of files in a directory:

find . -type f | wc -l

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Filo Bolla

April 21, 2020

It is also possible to delete the entries of find command with a simple -delete, just found that after a thousand wrong typed -exec rm

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Anzan Hoshin Roshi

April 21, 2020

Thank you, Jay.

Reply

tpasi2020UG

April 21, 2020

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! You do not know how much these tutorials have helped.

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